Disclaimer- Nothing on this page or any of the pages constituting this web site should be construed as offering legal advice. The following is provided for informational purpose only and may or may not apply to your particular case or set of circumstances. Before taking any action or relying on anything on these pages, you should consult with an attorney.
1. Preserve and Gather Evidence- Preserve and obtain as much evidence of the accident scene or the injuries as possible. Obtain names and contact information of people who my have witnessed what happened or the conditions at the scene of the incident. Make notes of what you observed prior to, at and just following the incident. Take photographs. If you are not able to do so, have a family member or friend do this for you.

2. Seek medical attention- Any time one is injured, it is important to seek medical attention. The extent of the injuries sustained are not always evident. Sometimes, the nature and extent of injuries is not known for days or even weeks after the incident.

3. Photographs or videotape- Pictures and videotape recording make great evidence. They may help your attorney convince a jury or claims adjuster of the merits of your case and the extent of your injuries. Photograph the accident scene including the surrounding conditions. Record your injuries, such a bruising and cuts.

4. Dealing with Insurance Company Representative- Despite what their representatives may tell you, insurance companies are in the business of minimizing the amount of money they pay out. Insurance adjusters and investigators will ask for a statement. Do not give an insurance claims adjuster or investigator a written or recorded statement regarding the accident and your injuries. Speak to an attorney first. What you say can and will be used against you.

5. Keep a journal- Keep a simple journal for your attorney recording the date and time of events including medical care issues, telephone conversations with any insurance representative, your injuries and any pain or limitations you are suffering through because of your injuries.

1. Document Document Document- Documents often make the difference between whether a case is won or lost. Everything from employee handbooks, written disciplinary procedures, job descriptions, performance reviews and e-mails may contain valuable information.

2. Keep a journal- Keep a simple journal recording the date and time of any events including any conversations regarding your employment.

3. Preserve Evidence of Conversations- In order to preserve evidence, if a conversation takes place that relates to your employment, document the conversation by sending an e-mail or other communications to that person confirming what he or she said.

4. Protect Evidence- Keep your journal, hard copies of any communications including e-mails or other possible evidence at home or some place other than at your place of employment.

5. Consult With An Attorney- Do not sign severance agreement without first consulting an attorney.

1. Protect and Recognize Your Intellectual Assets- Some of the most valuable and often most overlooked business assets are intellectual assets. Intellectual assets include such things as your company name, product name, company goodwill, customer list and other confidential information about your business and your operations. These assets can be protected if you take the appropriate steps.

2. Register Your Trademark- Trademarks often represent the goodwill your business has developed in the marketplace over the years. Registering your trademark with the United States Patent and Trademark Office provides the trademark owner with additional rights and protections nots afforded to businesses whose marks are not registered. Not only will a federally registered trademark provide you with added protection, the federal registration will be viewed as an asset by prospective investors or buyers.

3. Protect and Secure Trade Secrets and Proprietary Information-Many types of information can be the subject of trade secret protection. How the information is treated often determines whether the information in questions can benefit from trade secret status. Clients commonly are faced with the misappropriation of valuable information by former employee by former employees, vendors, contractors and competing businesses. For those who seek trade secret protection for their valuable and confidential information, certain steps should be taken to gain trade secret status and protection. For example, using licensing agreements with confidentiality requirements, non-disclosure agreements for third party developers, employee confidentiality agreements, limiting access to only those needing the information and heightened security at the place of storage.

4. Avoid Employment Claims- Employment claims alleging wrongful termination or related causes of action can be costly both in attorney fees and costs and time. Limit your exposure to such claims by adopting employment practice which will help deter and if need be defeat such claims. For example, have employee acknowledge in writing their status as at-will employees. Employee handbooks should be utilized in situations where they benefit the employer.

5. Contracts- Before entering into any agreement, it is advisable to consult with an attorney. Certain clauses contained in contracts may help an individual or business deal with certain disputes. For example, a simple attorney fee or venue selection clause may or may not be to your benefit depending on the particular situation.
1. Obtain Document- Documents often make the difference between whether a case is won or lost. In wage and hour cases, the following type of documents may be extremely important: employee handbooks, job descriptions, performance reviews, pay check stubs, time sheets or records, sales commission policies and e-mails or other communications from supervisors or co-workers.

2. Preserve Evidence of Conversations- In order to preserve evidence, if a conversation takes place that relates to your employment, document the conversation by sending an e-mail or other communications to that person confirming what he or she said.

3. Protect Evidence- Keep your journal, hard copies of any communications including e-mails or other possible evidence at home or some place other than at your place of employment.

4. Inform Your Employer In Writing- Inform your employer in writing of any problem you may have concerning the payment of your wages. The law protects employees from retaliation from their employers in many of these type of instances.